Sound Session

Sound for Video Session: Timecode Apps - Convert Audio Timecode to Metadata Timecode

When using timecode to speed up the process of syncing audio clips to separately recorded video clips, there are times when you need to use consumer cameras. These cameras usually do not have a proper timecode input so you have to record the timecode to an audio track via the camera’s microphone input. In this session, we cover a few apps which will convert that audio timecode to a format your video editing app (NLE) can use to quickly sync all your video and audio clips.

Please consider my sound for video classes.

Gear and apps used to record this episode:

DaVinci Resolve - works about 50% of the time in my experience (Version 15.4.2)

LTC Convert - Solid, straightforward option for converting audio timecode to metadata/file timecode

Tentacle Sync Studio - Included free when you buy a Tentacle Sync timecode generator

Timecode Systems Ultrasync One - Wireless timecode generator

Ambient Recording NanoLockit - Wireless timecode generator

Tentacle Sync E - Bluetooth enabled timecode generator

Nikon Z6 Mirrorless Full Frame Camera

Panasonic GH5 Camera

AKG C414 XLS large diaphragm condenser microphone - this is my new, main voice over microphone

Universal Audio Apollo x6 - Thunderbolt 3 audio interface used to take audio signal from the dbx286S channel strip, convert it to digital, and send to my computer for recording.

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Outro music from Artlist: Sunday by Rich Young Pixies - Amazing Journey. You can receive a 2 month discount on a subscription to Artlist, a subscription service for stock music you can use with your videos. Check it out at Artlist.io

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Q&A 9 Feb 2019

Its time to answer your sound for video related questions! For those new to the channel here, as part of my online school, we have question and answer sessions every few weeks. If you’d like to be notified when a new Q&A session is coming up, sign up for free at Learn Light and Sound. You can also preview several segments from my online courses on sound for film.

Here are the questions we covered this week:

00:07 Wireless hop to camera with Sennheiser G3?

01:10 Microphones for recording a concert?

02:18 Plugins for cleaning up background noise?

04:42 Room tone and sound effects? M/S Recording?

06:24 Stereo microphones for recording concerts?

07:17 Timecode from Zoom F8n to Panasonic GH4?

08:53 Remote Audio Battery distribution system and powering Panasonic GH5?

11:47 Why hasn’t the perfect recorder and microphones been developed yet?

17:07 Can I de-noise as the last step in my post workflow?

22:35 Audio, sound, film book recommendations?

28:20 If I have 2 UltraSync 1s, should I use just one or both for 1 cam shoots?

32:10 If my video will be H.264, does it matter if I use 48kHz vs 96kHz?

34:30 What are microdot cavaliers?

37:32 Person moves in and out of mic sweet spot, what do I do?

39:55 Will the new version of ARRI Alexa come with a boom holder?

40:10 What’s the difference between trim and fader?

42:58 Order of operations when processing dialogue audio?

49:12 Should I upgrade from RODE NTG2 to NTG4?

51:03 I’m getting older and my hearing is not good. How do I compensate?

57:42 Izotope RX, Logic Pro, Audition, and changing sample rates?

1:00:20 Powering a recorder. I have a 20 hour battery vest!

1:02:20 Audio repair software suggestions?

1:04:22 How would you cleanup this audio recording?

Here are a few previous sessions we references in today’s Q&A session:

Wireless Hop to Camera with Sennheiser G3 with Gregg Palmer:

Recording Live Concerts with Mike Strands:

Accusonus ERA-D Noise Reduction Demo:

Gear we discussed in today’s session:

Sound Reinforcement Handbook, 2nd Edition - Dense but very good reference for anyone serious about sound

Location Sound Bible - one of my favorites on recording sound for film. Dated info re: specific gear, but otherwise very good info.

Sound Effects Bible - good reference on recording sound effects. Dated info re: specific gear, but otherwise very good info.

Hearos - Ear protection for loud locations

Zoom F8n Audio Recorder

Zoom F4 Audio Recorder

Ambient Recording Timecode Slate

Schoeps Super CMIT Shotgun Microphone - with real-time noise reduction. Not cheap, but very effective.

Cedar DNS - hardware real-time noise reduction. Not cheap, but very effective.

Universal Audio Apollo x6 - Thunderbolt 3 audio interface which can basically replace a full rack of analogue audio processing gear

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Outro music from Artlist: Sunday by Rich Young Pixies - Amazing Journey. You can receive a 2 month discount on a subscription to Artlist, a subscription service for stock music you can use with your videos. Check it out at Artlist.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Loudness Normalize your Video Sound in Adobe Audition

How do you get loud audio for your video projects? What if the music is much louder than the dialogue or speaking parts? In this session, we cover the basics of mixing music and dialogue and show how to loudness normalize your video’s sound using Adobe Audition.

Please consider my sound for video classes available over at Learn Light and Sound.

Gear used to record this episode:

AKG C414 XLS large diaphragm condenser microphone - this is my new, main voice over microphone

dbx 286s Preamplifier and channel strip - new vocal processing channel strip. I’ve had a ton of requests for help setting this up so I had to add one to my collection so I can learn how to use it first.

Universal Audio Apollo x6 - Thunderbolt 3 audio interface used to take audio signal from the dbx286S channel strip, convert it to digital, and send to my computer for recording.

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Outro music from Artlist: Sunscape by Oliver Michael. You can receive a 2 week discount on a subscription to Artlist, a subscription service for stock music you can use with your videos. Check it out at Artlist.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Timecode Generators

In this week’s Sound for Video session, we take a quick look at several timecode generators available on the market today.

The table comparing the TC generators we discussed today.

Gear discussed/used to record this episode:

Tentacle Sync Sync E

Ambient Recording NanoLockit

MozeGear TIG Q28

MozeGear TIG QBIT X2

Timecode Systems Pulse Base Station

Timecode Systems UltrSync One

Timecode Systems UltraSync Blue

Timecode Systems SyncBac Pro (for GoPro Hero 6 & 7)

Betso TCX-2+

AKG C414 XLS Large Diaphragm Condenser Microphone - used to record this session

Sound Devices 633 Audio Recorder/Mixer - used to record this session

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Outro music licensed from Artlist: Call on Me by Kick Lee

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Q&A 11 December 2018

In this week’s Sound for Video session, we answer your questions about production and post sound:

00:13 Isolating lavalier microphones

05:12 Which software to use for editing, mixing sound?

07:49 Can you use the F8/n as audio interface with F-Control?

08:56 Loudness vs Peak Normalizing

12:27 Default settings for Sennheiser G3?

13:37 Can you link the Zoom F4 & F8 to operate as one?

14:56 How to get “Radio Voice” with Audition?

18:07 How does the FCC frequency allocation affect you?

19:25 Sound Devices 688 and SL6

20:17 How does Sennheiser MKH416 compare to newer shotgun mics?

25:11 Dealing with ventilation/refrigerator that cannot be turned off?

26:58 Mixing foley?

27:41 How did I get a killer deal on these old Lectrosonics wireless kits?

30:40 How to mount timecode generator to camera?

31:47 MixPre: Meters and limiters

33:55 Are vintage mics overrated?

36:50 How do you get audio to a director?

37:18 Recommendation for enthusiast wireless mic systems?

38:52 Is the Tascam DR-60DmkII still a worthwhile purchase?

40:56 I do both music and film sound, should I get the MixPre-10T or 10M?

42:27 Zoom F8: How do I keep the settings I make on the app?

43:45 Zoom F8 5.1 firmware update: What’s new?

45:00 How to record iso channels on MixPre-6?

45:39 Recommended recording apps for iOS?

47:38 How to setup the dbx 286s?

48:41 Is Izotope RX worth its price?

51:00 Which frame rate settings do I use for timecode?


Previous videos mentioned in today’s session:

Fairlight in DaVinci Resolve:

Loudness normalization:

Foley:

Comtek wireless audio for directors:

MixPre-10M vs 10T:

Gear discussed/used to record this episode:

Moleskin for hiding lavalier microphones

Joe’s Sticky Stuff - two-sided tape for attaching lavalier mics to clothing or anything else

Zoom F8n eight channel audio recorder/mixer. One of my favorites. Paid my own hard-earned money for this thing.

Zoom F4 four channel audio recorder/mixer. Basically the same as the F8n but no app control, monochrome screen, and bigger knobs. Paid my own hard-earned money for this thing.

Sennheiser G4 solid analogue wireless mic kit

AKG C414 XLS - used to record today’s session. I was recovering from a cold at the time, so this isn’t the best representation of the sound possible with this mic. We’ll do another demo with it once my voice is back to normal.

Sound Devices 688 - Pro level audio recorder/mixer. It is the price of an older used car but a good buy for those doing paid production sound work.

Sound Devices SL6 - add on wireless receiver slot system which simplifies powering and using larger antennae for multiple slot-in wireless receivers from your sound bag.

Sennheiser MKH416 - Tjhe legendary shotgun microphone for film & TV production.

Sennheiser MKH8060 new generation shotgun microphone meant to replace 416

Sennheiser MKH8050 new generation indoor dialogue boom mic meant to replace MKH50

Sound Devices MixPre-3 - great little recorder from the company that makes amazing pro-level audio recorders. But this one is a lot more affordable. 3 mic inputs, analogue limiters.

Sound Devices MixPre-6- great little recorder from the company that makes amazing pro-level audio recorders. But this one is a lot more affordable. 4 XLR mic/line inputs plus a 3.5mm stereo input, analogue limiters.

Sound Devices MixPre-10T- great big recorder from the company that makes amazing pro-level audio recorders. But this one is slightly more affordable. 8 XLR mic/line inputs plus a 3.5mm stereo input, 2 balanced and 2 unbalanced outputs, analogue limiters. etc. Great recorder. My favorite sub $2000 USD option.

Tascam DR-60DmkII great budget recorder (XLR inputs are good, 3.5mm not so good)

CEntrance Mixerface R4 audio mixer/recorder

dbx 286s channel strip - good for voiceover and live broadcast sound

Universal Audio Apollo x6 USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 Audio Interface - used to record the voice over for the screen cast

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Outro music licensed from Artlist: Awaken by Ethan Rank

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Edit/Mix Room Tour 2018

After several requests and despite my prior objections, this week’s episode is a virtual tour of my mix/edit room. This is where I edit all of my videos, edit and mix the sound for these videos, and generally work. I hesitated to do this because I don’t want anyone to think that you have to have expensive tools to edit and mix good sound for video. You can start with a basic computer and set of headphones. Once you’re getting paid to mix and edit sound for video, then it generally makes sense to invest in some tools that will help you get the job done more efficiently.

Please consider my sound for film courses.

Gear and links discussed/used to record this episode:

Sennheiser MKH 8050 Supercardioid boom microphone

Oktava MK-012 Cardioid boom microphone

Schoeps CMCmk41 Supercardioid boom microphone

Furman PL-8C Power Conditioner

Universal Audio Apollo x6 Thunderbolt 3 Audio Interface with 5.1 surround monitoring

Focal Solo6 Be Powered Reference Monitors (Speakers)

Mackie 802VLZ4 Analogue Mixer

Sony MDR-7506 Closed Back Headphones - my first choice for when I’m recording/mixing on location

Beyerdynamic DT770 Pro - my second choice for when I’m recording/mixing on location

Beyerdynamic DT880 Pro Semi-open Back Headphones - my first choice for reasonably priced mixing headphones

Sennheiser HD820 Closed Back Reference Headphones - My favorite very expensive headphones for mixing

Golden Age Project Pre-73mkIII - A modern day copy of the Neve 1073 preamp. All analogue. Fuzzy and warm

Golden Age Project R1 Active mkIII - A reasonably priced ribbon microphone with a smooth high frequency roll-off which I like for recording voiceover and harsh instruments. Smooth

Electrovoice RE20 Dynamic Broadcast Microphone

Allen & Heath SQ5 Digital Mixer/Audio Interface

Blackmagic Pocket cinema Camera 4K - used to shoot this episode

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Outro music licensed from Artlist: Keep an Eye by Back to Dream. Artlist provides high quality music tracks for your film and video projects. You can receive two months off an Artlist account by using our link: https://artlist.io/artlist-70446/?a_a...

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Recording Audio in a Tesla Model 3

In this session, I'm looking for a way to record decent dialogue audio in a moving car, specifically the Tesla Model 3. In this test, we put the following to the test:

CEntrance Mixerface R4R Audio recorder/USB audio interface

RODELink Filmmaker Kit

JK MicJ Headset Microphone

If you wanted to skip the Wireless kit and connect the microphone directly into the Mixerface R4R recorder, use the RODE VXLR+ adapter.

Tesla - If you plan to buy a new car, Tesla makes some really nice options. Using my link, you'll get a little extra, i.e., free supercharging for 6 months.

Copyright 2018, Curtis Judd

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: MixPre 10T Power Options

What are the options for powering the Sound Devices MixPre-10T? Here we cover the main options to keep your recording sessions smooth and trouble free.

This is an excerpt from my course, Getting the Most From Your MixPre-3, 6, 10T. Please consider my sound for film classes available over at the school.

Gear and links discussed/used to record this episode:

Sound Devices MixPre-10T Audio Recorder/Mixer

Sennheiser MKH 8050 Supercardioid Boom Microphone (used to record this segment)

AC to Hirose Adapter (B&H) If you’ve got AC power available, this will power the 10T for as long as you need.

12 Volt Battery Bank (Amazon): One of the more affordable powering options. There’s also a higher capacity version for twice the price.

DC Barrel to Hirose cable (Amazon): Required to connect the above battery bank to your MixPre-10T

JuiceBox V-mount (Amazon): Cinema style battery that will power the MixPre-10T for up to 10 hours, depending on how many mics and phantom powered channels you use.

D-tap to Hirose cable (Amazon): Use this cable to attach the V-mount battery to your MixPre-10T

Remote Audio BDS (Battery Distribution System - B&H): Pros use solutions like this - one battery will power everything in your bag, including wireless. Not for use with consumer grade wireless systems.

Hi-Q Style battery (B&H): Li-Ion battery with a microchip which optimizes the performance of the battery over time. This is the battery system I use.

Hi-Q Battery cup to BDS cable (B&H): I use this cup/cable to attach the Hi-Q battery to the BDS box.

NP1 Style battery. This is the “2nd option” I didn’t elaborate on in the video, very similar to the Hi-Q batteries, but without the microchip (B&H). If buying today, I’d go with the Hi-Q instead.

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Outro music licensed from Artlist: Call on Me by Kick Lee. Artlist provides high quality music tracks for your film and video projects. You can receive two months off an Artlist account by using our link.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound Devices MixPre 10T Timecode Setup

How do you set up timecode on a MixPre-10T? Let's take a look at free run timecode on the 10T where the 10T is the master clock.

This is an excerpt from my course, Getting the Most From Your MixPre-3, 6, 10T. Please consider my sound for film classes available over at http://school.learnlightandsound.com

Gear and links discussed/used to record this episode: 

Sound Devices MixPre-10T

Sennheiser MKH 8050 Supercardioid Boom Microphone (used to record this segment)

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Zoom F8/F8n Basic Settings

What are the basic things you need to setup to get recording quickly with the Zoom F8 or F8n? We cover them here!

This is an excerpt from my upcoming course, Getting the Most From Your Zoom F8/F8n. Please consider my sound for film classes available over at the school.

Gear and links discussed/used to record this episode: 

Zoom F8n Audio Field Recorder

Sennheiser MKH 8050 Supercardioid Boom Microphone (used to record this segment)

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!