Camera Gear

Insta360 ONE X: 360 Action Cam Overview

Insta360’s new ONE X action cam marks a substantial step forward for action cameras. I haven’t been a big fan of 360 video in the past until I saw how the ONE X could help me with behind-the-scenes and lighting breakdown shoots. I often don’t have anyone around to help me shoot BTS or follow me while I explain how to setup a lighting design. The ONE X allows me to do this by letting me shoot 360 video, and then re-compose the shot in post so it looks like I had a camera operator follow me around!

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio in Adobe Audition and DaVinci Resolve/Fairlight, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

Insta360 ONE X - 360 Action Camera

Lupo Superpanel Full Color 60 - Used as the key light in the talking head clips

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 OIS Lens - used on the GH5S (Amazon)

Panasonic GH5S - used to shoot the talking head shots (Amazon)

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2018 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

Hollyland Mars 300 HDMI Video Transmitter System

Hollyland is a relatively new company making wireless video transmitter systems. The first question you might ask is, why would I need something like that? When you start working on productions with a budget and several crew members, directors often find it useful to have a wireless monitor. This allows them a bit more freedom to move up and work more intimately with the actors without giving up their view of the camera’s framing. The problem with these wireless systems is that they’re traditionally quite expensive, well over $1000 USD just for an entry level kit.

In this episode, we look at the Hollyland Mars 300 HDMI wireless video transmitter kit which transmits up to 300’ and runs less than $500 USD.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio in Adobe Audition and DaVinci Resolve/Fairlight, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

Hollyland Mars 300 HDMI Wireless Transmitter System

Portkeys HS7T HDMI/3G SDI Monitor (Amazon)

Aputure COB 120DII - used as one of the background lights

Lupo Superpanel Dual Color 60 - key light for all of the shots in this video

Lupo Superpanel Full Color 60 - RGBW light used to light the background

Panasonic GH5 (Amazon)

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 OIS Lens (Amazon)

Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - used to shoot the talking head and most of the product shots

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2019 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

Help Please: GH5, ATOMOS, MixPre HDMI Timecode and Control

I'm hoping that our community might be able to solve this together.

I've received the same question 4 times this week alone: How do I get timecode and Record Start/Stop controls to work with the GH5, ATOMOS (Ninja V, Sumo, Shogun, etc.), and the MixPre (3, 6, 10T) via HDMI?

I was NOT able to get all of them working by routing and HDMI cable from the GH5 to the Sumo, and from the Sumo to the MixPre. However, I confirmed with the same cables that it works when you use just the GH5 and MixPre or just the GH5 and ATOMOS recorder.

One hypothesis is that an HDMI splitter might solve the problem: Route an HDMI cable from the GH5 to an HDMI splitter, and from there, one of the splitter outputs to the ATOMOS and the other output to from the splitter to the MixPre.

Has anyone had success with this?

If this works, there's still the problem of how to power the HDMI splitter as most of them require power. But I believe there are some which are USB powered so that might work.

Thanks if anyone has information on whether the HDMI splitter approach or any other approach works. I'll create another video if we are able to find a solution.

I know that this is a bit of a Frankenstein type of rig. I don't usually shoot this way but I used to and many others still do for various reasons.

Thanks!

Copyright 2019 - Curtis Judd

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - Initial Impressions

Cary and Curtis talk about their experience with the Blackmagic Pocket 4K camera so far. This is not a review, but a practical discussion about what we like and don't like. No camera is perfect for every job. But the P4K packs a lot of punch.

You can buy the Pocket 4K at B&H

If you want to run an XLR microphone into the P4K, you'll need an adapter cable like this

And here is the cable that allows you to power the P4K with a cine battery with a d-tap output

Copyright 2019 by Cary and Curtis Judd

Audio Features - Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K

In this episode, we have a look at (and listen to) the audio features on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - I used this to record this episode, including the audio directly from the DPA 4017b

Mini XLR to XLR Adapter Cable (Amazon) - you’ll need at least one of these to get a standard XLR cable into your Pocket 4K. This is a pack of 2 (always good to have a backup) and seems to be of very high quality

Blackmagic power adapter cable kit - I use the 2-pin to d-tap cable to power the Pocket 4K with an Anton Bauer Digital 90 cine battery. Will work with any cine battery with d-tap output (v-mount, gold mount, etc.)

Tentacle Sync E Timecode Generator

Deity S-Mic 2 Shotgun Microphone (Amazon)

RODE NTG2 Shotgun Microphone (Amazon)

Shure SM-58 Dynamic Microphone (Amazon)

Panasonic 12-35mm F/2.8 OIS Lens (Amazon) - Used on the Pocket 4K camera

Lupo Superpanel Dual Color Panel Model 400 - Bounced off of a big piece of white foamcore for the key light

Aputure AL-MW (Amazon) - background light for all of the talking head shots. Cool little waterproof light with in-built Li-Ion battery that lasts 80 minutes at full power

Aputure COB120t (Amazon) - background light for product shots

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2019 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

Glider Pro 3 - 4th Axis Stabilizer for Single Handle Motorized Gimbals

In this episode, we review the Glider Pro 3, a 4th axis stabilizer for single handle motorized gimbals. Why would you ever want something like this? When shooting walking shots, have you ever noticed that there’s some bouncing in the footage with your footsteps? This helps reduce that. Let’s take a look!

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

Scotty Makes Stuff Glider Pro 3 Duo - 4th axis stabilizer with two handles and the option to configure with one handle

Panasonic GH5S (Amazon) - Used this camera on all of the gimbal shots

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - I used this to record everything but the gimbal shots in this episode

Panasonic 12-35mm F/2.8 OIS Lens (Amazon) - Used on the Pocket 4K camera and the GH5S. On the gimbal shots, we turned the image stabilization on the lens off so that you could see how the gimbal and Glider Pro 3 work without the help of camera or lens stabilization.

Sennheiser MKH 8050 (Amazon) - Microphone used for this episode

Sound Devices 633 Audio Recorder/Mixer

Aputure COB 120dII (Amazon) - key light

Aputure Light Dome II (Amazon) - soft box for key light

Aputure COB120t (Amazon) - background light

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2018 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

PortKeys HS7T Monitor: 1200 Nit HDMI & SDI 4K On-Camera 7" Monitor

In this episode, we review the PortKeys HS7T on-camera 7” monitor. What makes this monitor unique is that it can produce brightness levels of up to 1200 nits, has HDMI and SDI inputs, can take 4K DCI signals up to 60p via HDMI, and has good power options.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

PortKeys HS7T on-camera 7” HDMI/SDI Monitor (Amazon)

Also an HH7 (Amazon) version without the SDI input and support for up to 30p at a lower price.

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - I used this to record most of this episode

Panasonic 12-35mm F/2.8 OIS Lens (Amazon) - Used on the Pocket 4K camera

Aputure COB 120dII (Amazon) - key light

Aputure Light Dome II (Amazon) - soft box for key light

Aputure COB120t (Amazon)- background light

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2018 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

Freetail Evoke CFast 2.0 Card & Blackmagic Pocket Cinema 4K Camera - Supported Framerates and Codecs

In this episode, a look at which resolutions, frame rates, and codecs the FREETAIL EVOKE CFast 2.0 (x3700) cards can support on the Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses, including processing dialogue audio, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

FREETAIL EVOKE CFast 2.0 (x3700) Card (Amazon)

Lexar CFast 2.0 Card Reader USB 3 (Amazon)

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - I used this to record most of this episode

Panasonic 12-35mm F/2.8 OIS Lens (Amazon) - Used on the Pocket 4K camera

AKG C414 XLS Microphone - recorded the voiceover for this episode

Aputure COB120t (Amazon) - background light

Lupo DayLED 1000 Fresnel Light - this was the main light

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2018 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

Sound for Video Session: Timecode Systems UltraSync Blue Demo

In this week’s session, we take a look at a wireless timecode generator you can use to make syncing audio and video from your mobile phones and tablets quick and easy: The Timecode Systems UltraSync BLUE.

The BLUE can send timecode to up to 4 devices at the same time and can also connect wirelessly to UltraSync generators attached to cinema cameras or professional level audio recorders.

At the time of this review, the compatible apps are for iOS, available in the App Store:

Apogee MetaRecorder (audio recording app)

Mavis (Cine style camera app)

Gear and links discussed/used to record this episode:

Timecode Systems UltraSync BLUE - Bluetooth wireless timecode generator

Sennheiser ClipMic digital (Amazon) - used to record the talking head clips into the MetaRecorder app

Electrovoice RE20 (Amazon) Dynamic Broadcast Microphone - used to record the voice over for the screen cast portion

Universal Audio Apollo x6 USB-C/Thunderbolt 3 Audio Interface - used to record the voice over for the screen cast

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Outro music licensed from Artlist: Keep an Eye by Back to Dream

MOZA AIR 2: How to Balance & Mini Review

Single handle motorized gimbals for interchangeable lens hybrid and DSLR cameras have come a long way over the last few years. The original MOZA AIR was really good for the smaller ILM cameras and had a great app for remote control and time-lapse. The newest gimbal from MOZA, the AIR 2, is a nice step forward in a lot of ways. It can handle much heavier payloads, uses separate axis controls rather than “modes”, impressive battery life, a new shorter pan arm which makes it easier to see the screen on your camera and quickly and smoothly go to a low shot.

In this episode, we cover how to balance your camera on the MOZA AIR 2 and do a mini review.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

Gudsen MOZA AIR 2 Gimbal for Interchangeable Lens Hybrid and DSLR Cameras

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - I used this to record most of this episode

Aputure COB120dmkII (Amazon) - Key light in the talking head clips

Aputure Light Dome II (Amazon) - Newer version of the big soft box with faster setup and gel holder

Lupo Superpanel Full Color 30 - RGB 1x1 LED panel light

Panasonic 12-35mm F/2.8 OIS (Amazon) Lens - Used on the GH5 gimbal shots

Panasonic GH5 (Amazon) Camera - Used on the gimbal shots

Glider Pro 3 4th Axis Dual Handles by Scotty Makes Stuff - Review coming soon

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2018 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.