Wireless

Hollyland Mars 300 HDMI Video Transmitter System

Hollyland is a relatively new company making wireless video transmitter systems. The first question you might ask is, why would I need something like that? When you start working on productions with a budget and several crew members, directors often find it useful to have a wireless monitor. This allows them a bit more freedom to move up and work more intimately with the actors without giving up their view of the camera’s framing. The problem with these wireless systems is that they’re traditionally quite expensive, well over $1000 USD just for an entry level kit.

In this episode, we look at the Hollyland Mars 300 HDMI wireless video transmitter kit which transmits up to 300’ and runs less than $500 USD.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio in Adobe Audition and DaVinci Resolve/Fairlight, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

Hollyland Mars 300 HDMI Wireless Transmitter System

Portkeys HS7T HDMI/3G SDI Monitor (Amazon)

Aputure COB 120DII - used as one of the background lights

Lupo Superpanel Dual Color 60 - key light for all of the shots in this video

Lupo Superpanel Full Color 60 - RGBW light used to light the background

Panasonic GH5 (Amazon)

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 OIS Lens (Amazon)

Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - used to shoot the talking head and most of the product shots

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2019 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are Amazon.com or B&H Photo affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

RODE WIRELESS GO Review: Simple Wireless Microphone System

RODE’s new WIRELESS GO is a wireless microphone system designed to be simple and quick to use but also has the ability to add external lavalier microphones for cases where you want an even more discreet look. This system is well suited for vloggers, YouTubers, and for cases where you want to do quick pick-up interviews without a lot of fuss getting set up. Let’s take a closer look and listen to see how it performs.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio in Adobe Audition and DaVinci Resolve/Fairlight, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

RODE WIRELESS GO - Super simple to use wireless microphone system

RODELink Filmmaker Kit - More versatile wireless microphone system with longer range and more options for add-on transmitters. Can also control the input and output levels on the transmitter and receiver.

Lupo Superpanel Dual Color 60 - key light for all of the shots in this video

Lupo Superpanel Full Color 60 - RGBW light used to light the background

Panasonic GH5 (Amazon)

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 OIS Lens (Amazon)

Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - used to shoot the talking head and most of the product shots

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2018 by Cary Judd. Used with permission.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are Amazon.com or B&H Photo affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

DEITY Connect Wireless Lavalier Microphone Review - 2 Mics 1 Receiver

Deity Microphones just released a new dual channel, digital wireless microphone system. This kit includes two transmitters and microphones which transmit to a single dual channel receiver. This is one of the few dual channel systems available for under $700 USD. In this episode, we dive into the details and find out how it sounds, how well it remains connected without interference or dropouts, and how it works with various cameras or recorders.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio in Adobe Audition and DaVinci Resolve/Fairlight, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

Deity Connect Dual Channel Wireless Microphone System

Panasonic GH5 Camera

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 OIS Lens

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2017 by TVAC. Used with permission.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are Amazon.com or B&H Photo affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

RODE WIRELESS GO - NAB 2019

On the show floor at NAB 2019, we met up with Ryan Burke of RODE Microphones to have a look at their new WIRELESS GO system - a small, very simple to use wireless microphone system.

The audio in this episode was recorded entirely with the WIRELESS GO into a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. The audio was loudness normalized to -23 LUFS and no other processing was applied.

This was a brutal test for a wireless system - on the show floor at NAB with a ton of RF activity. The handheld mic I use during this was for backup but since the WIRELESS GO did so well, we muted the handheld in post.

The WIRELESS GO kit used to record the audio for this episode was provided free of charge to us. We were not paid further to produce this video.

If you’d like to learn how to make great dialogue audio for your film and video projects, please have a look at my courses including processing dialogue audio in Adobe Audition and DaVinci Resolve/Fairlight, recording sound, how to use the Zoom F8 and F8n, and how to get the most from the Sound Devices MixPre series of recorders.

Links to gear used in this video:

RODE WIRELESS GO

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 OIS Lens

Copyright 2019 by Curtis Judd

Music Copyright 2017 by TVAC. Used with permission.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are Amazon.com or B&H Photo affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Audio Ltd A10 Wireless Microphone System - Sound Devices NAB 2018

The professional location sound market now has a fully digital wireless microphone system option - the Audio Ltd A10 from Sound Devices! Here we have a closer look at the A10 system with Kish Patel at the Sound Devices booth at NAB 2018.

Gear covered and used to shoot this episode:

Audio Ltd A10 Wireless Microphone System

RODE Reporter Microphone

RODE iXLR Adapter (Record a dynamic XLR microphone to iPhone or iPad)

Panasonic GH5

Panasonic 12-35mm f/2.8 OIS Lens - incredibly versatile lens that is on the GH5S most of the time

Copyright 2018 by Curtis Judd 

Music - MzA by Cary Judd, used with permission.

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Wireless Headphone Feeds (Comtek)

What do you do when the director or producer come to you and say, "I need 4 headphones..."?

Here's a brief overview of setting up wireless headphone feeds for producers, directors, and others on set. You can do this a variety of ways, even using a spare wireless lav system (but that only gets you one set of headphones). On the pro sets, they often use Comtek or similar wireless systems which are nice in that you can send the same feed to as many sets of receivers as you need from a single transmitter in your sound bag.

Links to gear discussed in this session:

Comtek M-216 Transmitter (Option P7) - expensive but sturdy and up for several years of service on rough and tumble sets and locations.

Comtek PR-216 Receiver - This is the thankfully less expensive receiver. You can use as many of these as you need with a single transmitter. Also well built for years of service

Comtek XLR to 3.5mm adapter cable - If your mixer/recorder has an XLR  output that you'll use to feed audio to the Comtek transmitter, here's an adapter cable to make that work. If your mixer/recorder has a 3.5mm output, any 3.5mm TRS to 3.5mm TRS cable will do. Just keep it short so it doesn't pick up interference.

Sony ZX110 Headphones - Good enough to get the job done with comfort, plenty loud. They fold and have flat cables which help prevent tangles. Not too hard on your pocketbook if they get destroyed by a crew member (about $15 USD each).

Copyright 2017 by Curtis Judd 

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

RØDELink Performer Wireless Handheld Microphone Kit

Sometimes I shoot live events. In my case that is mostly corporate conference meetings. In these cases, sometimes a wireless lavalier is the best option but in others, we don’t have time to get the lavalier microphone in place and a handheld wireless mic is a better option. RODE has just introduced their new RODELink wireless handheld microphone kit which fits this niche for me quite nicely. In this overview I cover my initial impressions as well as the features of the kit. In short: RODE has added an affordable, high quality option to their RODELink wireless system!

Thanks to RODE for providing the Performer kit for this review. They have not paid me beyond providing the mic and all of the opinions shared here are my own.

The RODELink Performer kit is slated to start shipping in mid October 2017.

Links to Gear Discussed and used to shoot this review:

RODELink Performer Handheld Wireless Microphone Kit

RODELink Filmmaker Wireless Lavalier Kit

My review of the RØDELink Filmmaker kit: 

RODELink Newsshooter Wireless Reporter’s Microphone Kit

Aputure COB120t (used to light light me in the talking head shots)

FalconEyes CLL-1600TDX (used as the background light in the talking head portions of this video. This thing is HUGE)

FalconEyes RX-18TD (used as a rim light bounced off of foam core in the talking head portions of this video)

Aputure COB120d (used to light the product shots)

Sound Devices 633 Audio Recorder

Blackmagic Ursa Mini Pro Cinema Camera

Nikon 50mm f/1.8 AF-D Lens

Copyright 2017 by Curtis Judd 

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

Sound for Video Session: Wireless Hop from Mixer/Recorder to Camera with Sennheiser G3

In this week’s sound for video session we had a chat with Gregg Palmer, one of our friends and fellow sound mixers from Oregon. Gregg explains his experience using Sennheiser G3 wireless systems to send audio from your recorder/mixer to the cameras so that they also record high quality production sound.

Greg discusses the following gear:

Sennheiser G3 Wireless Lavalier System (Be sure to research whether this frequency band can be used in your local area)

Cable to Adapt from G3 Receiver to XLR input for Camera (if your camera has an XLR input)

Cable to send audio from Zoom F8 or F4 to G3 Transmitter and from G3 to camera

Sennheiser AVX Wireless Lavalier Kit (MKE2 Microphone)

Ethics statement: Some of the links above are affiliate links which means that if you click on them and buy, I get a small commission. You don't pay more by clicking these links than if you just went to the retailer’s web site on your own. I use the proceeds to buy additional gear to review and help you improve your sound, lighting, and video. Thanks for your support!

*Added 2 Jan 2017*

Mark Kirchner added additional technical information for those who would like to use this method to optimize the signal from the mixer to the transmitter:

Your guest on your G3 hop video can optimize the signal with a custom cable to turn his transmitter into a hop-transmitter that will receive a "tape level -15 dB audio signal. The wiring on the TX side should not be soldered to the tip of the TRS plug. The transmitter want to "see" a mono "unbalanced" signal, not a L/R signal like your video guest was sending it using stock TRS to TRS mini 3.5 plugs. E.T. designed this cable for me to "sum" the left/right channel(left/right mix-bus) to the G3 transmitter.  The audio signal leaves the mixer as L/R unbalanced signal (tape level -15 dB). To use this tape level signal correctly it must be sent (soldered) to the "ring" of the TRS plug.  If you like I will make you one for free for your Sound Devices 633 and then you can try it with a G3 TX and RX yourself.

The following are notes from a conversation with E.T. He designed this cable. I know you are not a "soldering guy" and purchase your XLR cables. It will take awhile to understand what I have written. Unity Gain, Reference Level, Gain Staging and Unbalanced/Balanced are concepts that take time, but worth the struggle to put them into the old gray matter. You might find it helpful to draw a diagram of the 2 connectors, using colored pens and different colors for each conductor.

Last, my family roots come from Grantsville Utah. There was a film made about my second cousin Kimball Johnson called "Pigweed Philosopher." Check it out it is about film-making. If you have been to Grantsville, you may have seen the old Victorian house on main street. That's the Johnson house, our family house. I saw you have not been on this sight in a while, so this letter may find you in 2017.

Best,

Mark Kirchner mkirchnersound@gmail.com

PS Thank you for interviewing "The Senator" Mike Michaels!

 

WIRELESS HOP from the 442 MIXER w/ SENNHEISER G3

Set-up

1.    Use the Sound Devices 442 Tape/Mix out (TA3) connector.

2.    Tape/Mix Out = -10 dB *

3.    Use Custom E.T. Mix-Out Hop Cable**

4.    Connect 442 to the G3 Tx

5.    Starting recommendations from E.T.; settings for the Tx –12 dB sensitivity.

6.    Set the Rx about the same and test.

*The Tape/Mix out of the 442 sends both left and right signals at a –14 dB level if the mixer is set for a "0" dBu reference level. All left channel assignments (channels 1-4 on the 442 mixer) will be “mixed” and output as a discrete “mixed left channel.” The right channel will mix all right channel assignments.

**The E.T. Hop Cable sends a unbalanced, left and right signal to a TRS connector, assigning the left and right signals to a single terminal (ring) on the TRS connector making a “summed mono signal” that the Sennheiser G3 transmitter needs for the proper signal input.

Note; The Sound Devices manual for the 442 mixer lists the maximum output level for the Tape/Mix Out as follows.

Page 24  Tape/Mix Out +6 dBu

Page 26  Block Diagram Inputs and Outputs

The schematic diagram (page 26) displays the Mic / Tape / Line  as  0/-14/-40 which should be written as Mic – 40 / Tape – 14 / Line “0” .

A “Tape Level Signal” is normally –10dBu. The designation of “tape level as –14” is based on an “0” dBu reference level. The Sound Devices schematic is based on a “0 dBu” reference level (-14 dBu @ “0” reference level = -10dBu @ +4 dBu reference level).

E.T. WIRELESS HOP CABLE (Sennheiser G3)

This cable was engineered for use with the Sound Devices 442* “mix/tape out” output on the TA3 output.

 

TA3f Connector

Redco TGS-1 Cable (2 conductors + shield and drain)

TRS 3.5 Mini locking connector

 

TA3f connector (output)

 

Pin 1 Ground  (Eric used drain wire)

Pin 2 Signal (+) red conductor (Left)

Pin 3 Return (-) clear conductor (Right)

 

 

TRS 3.5 Mini Connector **

 

Tip        No Connection

Ring      Signal and Return (+ @ -)

Sleeve   Ground (drain wire)

 

Notes:

*The Tape/Mix out of the 442 sends both left and right signals at a –14 dB level. All left channel assignments (channels 1-4 on the 442 mixer) will be “mixed” and output as a discrete “mixed left channel.” The right channel will mix all right channel assignments.

**The E.T. Hop Cable sends an unbalanced, left and right signal to a TRS connector, assigning both left and right channels to a single terminal (ring) on the TRS connector making a “summed mono signal” that the Sennheiser G3 transmitter needs for the proper signal input.

Sound for Video Session: USB vs XLR Microphones, Timecode Modes, Wireless Frequencies

In this episode, we covered several sound for video questions:

  • What’s the quality difference between USB and XLR based microphones?
  • Recommended XLR cable brands?
  • What are the different types of timecode?
  • When buying wireless transmitters and receivers, which blocks should I get for my area?
  • What can I do to reduce pickup of reverb and street noise when shooting in a parking garage?
  • Which digital audio workstation app is best?

US FCC wireless information

Remote Audio XLR Cables

Cables at Sweetwater

Explanation of different types of timecode modes (Matt Price)

Hair wraps to hold external cable in place on a boom pole

Audio Technica AT2005 USB/XLR Microphone

Blue Yeti Pro USB/XLR Microphone

(some of these are affiliate links)